Professor Nathan Hughes

About

Nathan is Professorial Research Fellow in the Faculty of Social Sciences. He joined the University of Sheffield in October 2017, having previously worked in the School of Social Policy at the University of Birmingham.

Nathan Hughes is on Twitter @nathanjhughes

Research Interests

Nathan’s research examines the potential applications of emerging understandings in the developmental neurosciences for criminology and criminal justice policy and practice. In particular he is concerned with responses to young adults in the criminal justice system and the criminalization of those with neurodevelopmental impairments.

Key Publications

Hughes, N., Chitsabesan, P., Bryan, K., Borschmann, R.  Swain, N., Lennox, C. and Shaw, J. (2017) Language impairment and comorbid vulnerabilities among young people in custody. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry,

Hughes, N., Scibberas, E. and Goldfeld, S. (2016) ‘Family and community predictors of language, socioemotional and behavior problems at school entryPLOS One, 1(7): e0158802

Hughes, N., Clasby, B., Williams, W.H. and Chitsabesan, P. (2016) ‘A systematic review of the prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders among young people in the criminal justice systemCogent Psychology, 3: 1214213

Hughes, N. and Strong, G. (2016) ‘Implementing the evidence on young adult neuromaturation: the development of a specialist approach in probation servicesThe Probation Journal, 63(4): 452–459

Hughes, N. and Pierse-O’Bryne, K. (2016) ‘Disabled Inside: neurodevelopmental impairments among young people in custodyPrison Services Journal, 226: 14-21

Hughes, N. (2016) The Burgeoning Influence of Developmental Neuroscience on Policy-Making: contrasted tales of pitfalls and potentials. Issues Paper Series. Melbourne School of Government: Melbourne. 

Hughes, N. (2015) ‘Understanding the influence of neurodevelopmental disorders on offending: utilizing developmental psychopathology in biosocial criminology’, Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society, 28(1): 39-60.

Hughes, N., Williams, W.H., Chitsabesan, P., Walesby, R., Mounce, L.T.A. and Clasby, B. (2015) ‘The Prevalence of Traumatic Brain Injury Among Young Offenders in Custody: A Systematic Review’, Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 30(2): 94-105.

Ryan, N.P., Hughes, N., Godfrey, C., Rosema, S., Catroppa, C. and Anderson, V. (2015) ‘Prevalence and Predictors of Externalizing Behavior in Young Adult Survivors of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury’, Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 30(2): 75-85.

Hughes, N.  and Chitsabesan, P. (2015) ‘Justice Matters: Support for young people with neurodevelopmental impairments’, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies Working Paper, CCJS: London.

Hughes, N. (2015) ‘Neurodisability in the youth justice system: recognising and responding to the criminalisation of neurodevelopmental impairment’, Howard League for Penal Reform, What is Justice? Series.

Hughes, N, Williams, H, Chitsabesan, P, Davies, R. and Mounce, L. (2012) Nobody Made the Connection: The prevalence of neurodisability in young people who offend. London: Office of the Children’s Commissioner.

Hughes, N. (2016) The Burgeoning Influence of Developmental Neuroscience on Policy-Making: contrasted tales of pitfalls and potentials. Issues Paper Series. Melbourne School of Government: Melbourne.